My work has always consumed me. If I love something, it is an unwavering love, an obsession that fluctuates between a therapeutic process and an unhealthy addiction. I found weaving post-college in a state of “Okay, what do I make now?” I had been a photo major stuck behind a screen all day desperate to make something, anything with my hands. As a kinesthetic learner, I always knew, deep down, a digital process was not for me. I need to move; I need to physically be a part of the process as much as possible. So, I looked for a solution.
My first unhealthy love was with ceramics. Clay. It is just the most satisfying & forgiving material that I have ever worked with. But, with that comes a wheel for throwing, a massive amount of raw material, and an expensive kiln. So that quickly became an unrequited love that was not an attainable reality.
Then, embroidery. While at Pratt in 2016 I found a printer that could print my photographs on canvas as large as I wanted. It was transformative. I found a way to turn my photographic process into a sculptural one. By embroidering my photographs, I was able to touch them, really touch the images to understand them, something I had so longed to do. But it was slow, a very slow process. I wanted to work big, and fast. I’m a millennial and while I deny most of the stereotypes of my generation, instant gratification is one I identify with.
So, weaving. I found it and it found me.
It’s the tactility of the process. The soft, squishy, smooth, and silky nature of the material. How the warp and weft almost become a second limb, an extension of you, weaving in and out in a meditative state. You forget to eat, you forget to drink, it’s all-consuming. Weaving for me is never about a “thing” at the end, it is never and will never be about the final product, it is always about the process.
Clouds
2021
Clouds (details)
2021
Cooler
2020
Cooler (detail)
2020
Warmer
2020
Warmer (detail)
2020
Complementary
2019
Fig. A, B, C
2021
Fig. A and C (details)
2021

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